Trekking through the Himalayas has undoubtedly been a highlight of my life. The mountains and scenery are picturesque and the culture still relatively untouched by the western world. It is the type of holiday that afterwards when you come home, you have a sense of achievement for what you have accomplished. It isn’t just sightseeing and posing for photos; trekking is tough.

But one of my favourite parts of trekking through the Himalayas is that it allowed me to interact with the local Sherpa people and gave me an insight into their daily lives. The people are hospitable and when you pass them on the road they give you the common greeting “Namaste”. For me, the adorable Nepalese children were a highlight. The children seem to like trekkers a lot as most children my group saw waved and said hello as we passed through their villages.

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Some Nepalese children approaching our group

One charming moment I experienced was on the second day of my trek when my group stopped for a break in a village. These two little kids from the village came running up to our group and started chatting away in Nepalese to us. We had no idea what they were saying so my group tried to say hello to the little kids in both Nepalese and English but we received no response or reaction  from that. I was sitting on a rock and the kids came up to me and started hitting my backpack softly with some leaves they were carrying. None of my group knew what the kids were up to, we all just thought the little kids were cute.  I should mention at this point that along the trek most trekkers buy chocolate bars as snacks to eat during the day. So anyway, One of the kids was looking at me, talking away and then in the middle of a sentence of Nepalese I hear the kid say ‘chocolate’. My whole group started laughing, the kids didn’t know how to say hello but chocolate they had down packed. I had one Twix bar left in my bag so I pulled that out and broke it in half for the two kids to share. Didn’t need to offer the chocolate to the kids, they snatched the chocolate out of my hand the second I had split it and ran back to their house yelling out something in Nepalese. So I found out that cheeky kids are everywhere, even in extremely remote areas such as the Himalayas!

We spent a while laughing about the kids cheekiness after they ran off, they must try to get chocolate off every tourist that comes through their town. I’m sure the kids are successful more times than not, I instantly caved to their cuteness!

Please post your own stories below, I would love to read them! Particularly the stories that made you smile.

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The cheeky chocolate kids

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